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Tag "html5 boilerplate"

On the topic of making Internet Explorer behave, one of the easiest things you can do to make sure the dreaded Internet Explorer 6 is up to reasonable snuff is to include a single Javascript snippet on your page.

Chrome Frame

The Google Chrome Frame is not new. It’s an IE plugin that acts as an additional rendering engine that delivers more or less the same features, offerings, and HTML5 + CSS3 goodness as the standard Google Chrome. Long story short, it’s a Google Chrome running inside your Internet Explorer. The ultimate problem was that it needed to be installed by a user with administrative rights.

And then the “non-admin” Chrome Frame came around. It’s a Chrome Frame that can be installed by any user on a client computer. Now, there’s virtually no reason anymore not to install it if you’re stuck on a legacy Internet Explorer for some reason.

Getting users to install Chrome Frame

Now, in order to be able to deliver all the cutting-edge HTML 5 rainbow goodness for your clients, you just have to make sure that install the Google Chrome Frame. How to do that?

Just include the following inside your markup, preferably right before the closing tag:

<!--[if lt IE 7 ]>
  <script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/chrome-frame/1.0.3/CFInstall.min.js"></script>
  <script>window.attachEvent("onload",function(){CFInstall.check({mode:"overlay"})})</script>
<![endif]-->

That’s pretty much it. If your webpage is loaded inside an Internet Explorer 6 or lower, a very prominent overlay attempts to convince your user to install Chrome Frame.

Learning from the HTML5 Boilerplate, Part 3

Of course, to make the most use of Chrome Frame, you’ll have to include the appropriate X-UA-Compatible value as detailed in this HTML5 Boilerplate article.

If you want to know more about the Google Chrome Frame, hop on over to the FAQ.

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The HTML5 Boilerplate is well-known across web programmers as a powerful starting template for (as the project homepage puts it) building fast, robust, future-proof sites. Out of the box, it provides HTML, CSS and Javascript code arranged in such a way to drive as much oomph into your pages as possible. Every nook, cranny, and design decision borrows from widely-accepted standards, and is supported by countless hours of research and testing.

While the HTML5 Boilerplate is awesome as a starting foundation for building awesome sites, it is also packed with code snippets and patterns you should be using for your projects. Just in case you’re not using the HTML5 Boilerplate for some reason.

Read More

The HTML5 Boilerplate is well-known across web programmers as a powerful starting template for (as the project homepage puts it) building fast, robust, future-proof sites. Out of the box, it provides HTML, CSS and Javascript code arranged in such a way to drive as much oomph into your pages as possible. Every nook, cranny, and design decision borrows from widely-accepted standards, and is supported by countless hours of research and testing.

While the HTML5 Boilerplate is awesome as a starting foundation for building awesome sites, it is also packed with code snippets and patterns you should be using for your projects. Just in case you’re not using the HTML5 Boilerplate for some reason.

Read More